Posts Tagged digital music

Digital music roundup: SoundCloud, Pandora, Twitter, eMusic and Spotify

SoundCloud

SoundCloud staff reductions cut deep, Twitter strikes live-streaming deal with Live Nation, Pandora slims down its operations, internet music pioneer eMusic relaunches and Spotify defends itself from ‘fake artist’ accusations.

SoundCloud has cut 40% of its staff in a defensive move to protect its independence within an increasingly tough online music market. The decision comes despite doubling its revenue in the last 12 months, but co-founder Alex Ljung said that, alongside the cost-cutting, further growth is needed from its advertising and subscription revenue streams. Less than a week after that announcement Ljung was forced to put out a statement saying ‘SoundCloud is here to stay’. Read the rest of this entry »

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Digital music roundup: Spotify, US streaming market, Samsung music, Neil Young and Gorillaz

Gorillaz

In this digital music roundup – the first in a possible series: Spotify’s paywall, the US streaming market, Samsung and Google Play Music, Neil Young’s new streaming service Xstream and two augmented reality apps from Gorillaz (pictured above)

Spotify will allow labels to put new albums behind a two-week ‘paywall’, during which time they will only be available to the streaming service’s paying users. It concluded separate deals with digital rights agency Merlin, which negotiates on behalf of thousands of indies – including Sub Pop, Epitaph and Domino, and Universal Music Group (UMG). The flexible release policy also provides “unprecedented access to data, creating the foundation for new tools for artists and labels to expand, engage and build deeper connections with their fans”. Read the rest of this entry »

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The digital drug of the nation

YouTube Play at The Guggenheim (Flickr: @NYCphotos-flickr)

YouTube Play at The Guggenheim (Flickr: @NYCphotos-flickr)

If you have siblings/children/grandchildren of a certain age then you *might* have heard of Minecraft, which earlier this month extended its hold on popular culture with the launch of its own Lego range.

Videos of the blocky computer game form a massively popular sub-genre on YouTube – having been watched 47 billion times and counting – and it’s this sort of shift in media consumption that a new Ofcom report takes aim at. Read the rest of this entry »

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Travel in the opposite car

Spotify and Uber appear to have added a new way to annoy your taxi driver with a partnership that allows Spotify users to choose the music that plays in the taxi firm’s cars.

Soon users that connect their Spotify and Uber apps will be able to select music from either featured Uber playlists or their own ones on Spotify within the Uber app, or pick tunes from via the Spotify app. Read the rest of this entry »

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Exit #music

Twitter_music

In a move more likely to provoke a shrug of our collective shoulders than a lament for its passing, Twitter has decided to axe its #Music service.

Centred around a mobile app that was meant to help users discover new music and artists based on tweets, #Music was given a big launch last year for iOS devices.

Read the rest of this entry »

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We7 moves on (again)

We7_streaming_music

Pity poor We7. First the UK-based streaming music service was aiming, not entirely unsuccessfully, to be a browser-based Spotify, then it shifted to something more akin to Last.fm, and now it’s moving on again.

Or more accurately, Tesco has decided to subsume the company into its online film and TV download and streaming brand Blinkbox, nearly a year after taking a majority stake in the company for £10.9m. Read the rest of this entry »

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A digital music nation?

The recent release of a new album by indie cult favourites My Bloody Valentine was, if it ever happened, always going to be a big deal.

It’s not just that they invented a sound that simultaneously inspired a genre of music while  remaining impossible to accurately emulate. There’s also the small matter of the 22 year gap between new record M B V and Loveless, their last.

For the purposes for this blog what struck me about the record was the way it arrived, which was with almost as big a surprise as the new David Bowie album. Read the rest of this entry »

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